In the Spirit of Lokahi

Originally posted on Indigenous Medicine:
This is an interview conducted over the telephone between myself and Dr. Jane Ely that I thought would be worth posting. Mahalo Jane. In The Spirit of Lo’kahi: An interview on the work and world vision of Dr. Maka’ala Yates D.C. Written by: Dr. Jane Ely, D. Min. Lokahi is an ancient Hawaiian word with many layers of meanings. For Maka’ala Yates, lokahi is the essence of unity, peacemaking, harmony, connection, and embracing diversity. Ho’o lokahi is the action that brings about agreement, diversity, and unity. But it is much more than this. In the Hawaiian language there are tones, sounds, and meanings within meanings that carry vibrational frequencies of understanding, mana [life force], and healing. As Maka’ala explains, Lokahi is the platform upon which to communicate and illuminate healing and more importantly, to reunite that which has been broken back into unity, and awareness—in short, to renew a way of life. Dr. Maka’ala Yates is a remarkable man with a very large world vision. The Big Picture is nothing short of complete transformational change for the people of this earth. Although he would be the last person to admit it, he would perhaps say he is just here doing what he has come here to do. Or perhaps he might say, he woke up at a certain point in his life and ‘remembered’ why he came here and the job he came here to do. Born on the Big Island of Hawaii in a…

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Wai Ola: Water of Life

Originally posted on Indigenous Medicine:
Wai Ola Water of Life Life for Hawaiians, especially before colonization, was centered on water and agriculture (land). The most important food staple at that time was kalo (taro), which relied heavily on the mana (life-force) of the water because the kalo was considered ʻohana (family) to the Hawaiians. The mana of the water was established through attentive cleanliness of the river ways by ceremony, which included pule (prayers) by the villagers. These ceremonies and prayers were important in maintaining a positive relationship between land and water, which led to the same relationship to all Kanaka Maoli (native Hawaiians). There are two kinds of water in the Hawaiian language, wai (rain or land water) and kai (sea or salt water). The ancient God for wai was Kané and for the ocean water it was Kanaloa. Of the many water ceremonies used in pre-western contact Hawaii, the two most notable were kapu kai and pikai. Kapu kai is the ceremonial bathing of one’s self in the sea or salt water if on land. This ceremony was done to purify the body and spirit of the individual,especially when an imbalance was present. This type of ritual was usually done in private however;it was not uncommon for a group of villagers or family members to perform kapu kai to bring harmony and peace into their ahupuaʻa and ultimately the world. Ahupuaʻa (side note) The original purpose of the…

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Understanding Hawaiians (Na Kanaka Maoli)

Originally posted on Indigenous Medicine:
It is the year 2012 and the Polynesian Kingdom of Atooi (PKOA) is finally recognized by the United Nations as an indigenous sovereign nation.  After many years of painstaking struggle, we as Hawaiians can finally return home.  The government of Atooi now has jurisdiction over the U.S. government, occupying Hawaii according to international law and the recognition by the UN.  You can find the headquarters of this nation on the island of Kauai.  The Ali’i Nui (High Chief) is Aleka (Dayne) Aipoalani (a direct descendant of Kaumuali’i) and the kingdom’s website is http://www.atooination.com.  PKOA is composed of peoples from diverse cultures whose relationships share the mission of ho’opono ‘aina (to make right with the land).  Hawaiians now have an opportunity to regain their stolen lands and government (1893 colonial possession by the U.S). Atooi is a far cry from my young days growing up on the Big Island of Hawaii, when land was continually swindled from the Hawaiian people by the corrupt practices of the new invaders.  My father knew every Hawaiian living in West and knew that these people never sold their land to anyone.  I believe the term he used was “adverse possession.”  This is when an individual or a group pays taxes on a specific parcel of land, and after seven years, can claim that land if no one else has paid taxes on it.  You can look it up in Black’s…

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Maka’ala Yates on Ho’oponopono

Originally posted on Indigenous Medicine:
Ho’oponopono is the answer to bringing peace, harmony, wisdom and love into ones life and ultimately the community, society, the world, and the universe.  Meditation is an important element for ho’oponopono because it can increase and refine the receptivity of the Divine consciousness (Kumukahi) within all things.  Meditation is the indigenous Hawaiian way of reuniting the soul with our higher consciousness and with Kumukahi (the One Original Source).  The soul manifests its consciousness and mana (life-force) through the ‘piko’ (chakra) or centers of light or energy centers within the human cerebrospinal axis.  It is within this bodily prism that the soul consciousness and mana become identified with physical limitations. Our body is programmable by language, tones, words or thoughts, all of which carry a frequency.  The kind of frequency created determines the desired outcome of the producer.  Each individual must work on the inner process and development in order to establish a conscious communication with the DNA, which is our super—conductor that can store light, therefore, information. When a large number of people collectively come together with higher intentions such as meditating on peace – violent potentials will dissolve.  It is through meditation that all questions, all troubles, and all difficulties can be resolved or answered. The following is a sample of a simple Hawaiian meditation technique called “Alo Ha.”  If you would like to learn more go to http://www.manalomi.com and see about one of…

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